The Differences Between Pin Nailer and Brad Nailer

The pin nailer and brad nailer is the practical nailing tool. These two nailing tools look like similar and many times get confused by the woodworkers itself. This article will teach you the whole difference of nailer. And you can classify the nailer by looking it.

The Differences Between Pin Nailer and Brad Nailer

Nail Size

The size of the each nailer are different and it is quit little difficult for you to classify on the size of nail.

Pin Nailer

Pin nailers are normally use with 1” 23-gauge nails right out of box and the longer pin nailers can be come with 2.5” in length.

Brad Nailer

The brad nailer has a big diversity of nail size. Moreover, the most nailer’s ship is with 18 gauge 5/8” brad nails and can accommodate maximum of 2” nails.

Gauge

Pin Nailer

The nails are usually 23 gauge and can be purchased both with a small head or quite headless. Pin nailers can consist any type of pin nail gauge.

Brad Nailer

Brad nailers typically use with 18 gauge nails, so they are larger than pin nails. This makes the brad nailer better when working with thicker hard-wood than with thinner materials.

Nail Type

Pin Nailer

When we differentiate a pin nailer to a brad nailer is nail type. Normally, the pin nailer uses headless pins that are small enough for camouflaged by cloth, paint or veneer. The nails are headless pins and are lightly glued to one another.

Brad Nailer

“Brad nailer” from that name itself we can think about the nail of the brad nailer as brad nails. Similarly to the pin nails, the brad nails are glued together. But unlike the pin nails, the brad nailers have head. That means, whenever you nail with brad nails, the nails head will be visible.

Material Type

Pin Nailer

A good usage of a pin nailer would be for a project that is soft enough to be nailed. And they require a discreet finish for the project. A pin nailer is a great ideal when you need to nail a piece of cloth to a board and want it to be camouflaged perfectly.

Brad Nailer

We know that the brad nail have a head and they are not enough discreet as pin nails. The head of nails will be always visible according to the project and this nails will not show good finished look for works. But, the brad is better to hold more firmly most type of the wood than pin nails.

Application

Pin Nailer

Due to the weak binding force, pin nailers are ideal for nailing light materials like softwood together. If using a pin nailer with hard material, it would most likely bend the nails.

A pin nailer is lightweight and easy-to-use, so this nail gun typically drives pins into cabinetry, paneling or molding, producing near invisible holes.

Brad Nailer

Due to the higher gauge, brad nailers have a stronger binding force. A 1″ 18 gauge brad nail can hold almost any type of material stronger than pin nailer.

In fact, there are many usages for brad nailers. The most common usage of brad nailer is to trim carpentry. The woodworkers are normally using the brad nailer to nail molds, designs, frames and trims. The nails of brad nailer have distinctive large and flat head. Thus it not has most visually appealing in the projects. This is why the woodworker uses this nailer for work that is usually in the background and for the nailing the out of sights.

Price

Pin Nailer

Pin nailers are a bit more expensive than brad nailer. And the pin nailers are rare in the market, it will not easy enough as the brad nailer in case of buying a new one. The good pin nailer can be owned for $100 and upwards.

Brad Nailer

The brad nailer has good competition between the manufacturers and that take the price down and the quality to high. The good branded model’s price comes around $70.

Conclusion

Generally, brad nailers are much more popular and versatile than pin nailers since since brad nails come in various sizes and have good price. If you are looking to get a finish gun for your home project, make sure to go with the brad nailer. You can use it in almost all of your trim/finish jobs.

The pin nailer is good for some rare cases where you really need it, but can not afford to do more ‘heavy-duty’ finish jobs as the door casings and baseboards.

The Differences Between Pin Nailer and Brad Nailer
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